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Why Fuerteventura

Fuerteventura has no middle ground. Either you love her and can’t do without her, or you hate her and won’t want to go back.

Here there is an extreme nature, capable of challenging you with the “fury of the elements” in Apocalypse style or surprising you with its mild, enveloping, idyllic side, like an Earthly Paradise.

Fuerteventura did not have to try to convince us: it took 6 days between November and December of 2012, some even cloudy and very windy, to make us fall madly in love with her. And I’m not talking about a passing infatuation: we fell in love with this island in a mature, conscious and overwhelming way.

She bewitched us with her indifference, her self-confidence, the fact that she doesn’t pander, that she does not care about mass tourism. We love her for her ability to amaze us with different and beautiful landscapes, and for her tenderness when she decides to offer herself generously to us, on clear days full of light.

How do you love Fuerteventura?

Already from the first day we understood that to love her we must accept her as she is, even when she wakes up in a bad mood and throws her wind in our face (which won’t let us even open the car door), or her high waves and currents (which challenge us while we swim), or her sand that slips everywhere and sometimes we can’t remove even in the shower.

The paradox is that these primadonna “tantrums” of hers make her even more attractive to us.

Who is Fuerteventura not for?

Who expects bathing establishments with endless umbrellas and bars open 24 hours a day, where entertainers encourage you to do water aerobics; those who want to lie down on massage beds, eating pasta, sipping cocktails and dancing day and night, will not be at ease in Fuerteventura. Those who hate sand and wind, those who complain if the beaches are not equipped, those who want to go shopping in endless shopping centers, those who do not want to leave the tourist village, will not like this island and probably will not return.

Who is Fuerteventura for?

It is the perfect island for those who love and respect the environment, for those who recognize the freedom that only contact with nature can give. It is the island for people capable of appreciating panoramas of poignant beauty, beaches where you can practice countless sports and activities, for those who want to return to the perfect harmony of essential things. It is the island for the curious, willing to experiment with the many tasty indigenous foods based on goat cheese, grilled meat and fish.

It is the island for true travellers, who will love Fuerteventura to the point of returning many times.

Why Tindaya

The mountain of Tindaya is a place of incredible beauty, unique, rich in history, introspection and energy.

Here we have dawns so exciting that they seem like a dream. As it rises, the sun is capable of painting extraordinary colors: the sky is tinged with infinite shades of pink, blue, yellow, red, turquoise.

And the same happens at sunset.

The wide view from our house towards the horizon, free from buildings, factories and streets, opens up before the eyes, showing perfect chromatic games, in sublime harmony with each other. You will watch the sun drop into the sea as the clouds create new and mesmerizing shapes in the sky.

What we see from here every morning and evening moves us: these sensations are the most precious gifts that can be received from a place.

In prehistoric times, the aborigines of the ancient Maho people, the first inhabitants of Fuerteventura, chose Tindaya as a sacred place, where they can practice worship and spirituality. In the area of ​​the mountain there were over 300 podomorphic engravings (that is, depicting silhouettes of human feet), oriented towards the point of the winter solstice. Engravings like these are found in Fuerteventura, Lanzarote and North Africa, but only the mountain of Tindaya collects so many.

Tindaya

My dear friend Inma, an authentic Majorera (i.e. native to the island), one day told me:

If you want to see an exciting and unprecedented show every day, sit on the same stone in front of the sacred mountain of Tindaya at sunset: stop in the same place, you will see a new and beautiful landscape every evening.”

I followed her advice and found my place in the world.

Tindaya is the place that the aborigines of the ancient Maho people, the first inhabitants of Fuerteventura, used to devote to worship and spirituality in prehistoric times. In the area of ​​the mountain there were over 300 podomorphic engravings (that is, depicting silhouettes of human feet), oriented towards the point of the winter solstice. Engravings like these are found only in Fuerteventura, Lanzarote and North Africa, but only the mountain of Tindaya collects so many.

The exact meaning of these drawings is not known: it was discovered that the engravings of Lanzarote are facing exactly towards Tindaya, while those found in Tindaya are oriented in an extremely precise way towards sunset at various times of the year. In the winter solstice, this coincides with the position of the Teide (volcano of Tenerife, the highest mountain in Spain) and towards the island of Gran Canaria. Many mysteries remain to be discovered. The mountain of Tindaya is a place of incredible beauty, and also unique, rich in history, culture, art, magic, mystery, introspection and alas speculation and controversial projects.

In 1987 it was recognized as a Natural Monument, but this has not prevented its exploitation: since 1991 it has been transformed into a quarry from which to extract trachyte, a type of volcanic rock. This activity has ended, even if it has left visible scars on the mountain.

Most of the podomorphic incisions are practically invisible in sunlight: for this reason, without realizing it and without bad intentions, simply by walking, many of them have been destroyed. For this reason, the institutions have prohibited the ascent and visits to the mountain of Tindaya: it is necessary to apply for a permit to the Consejeria del Medioambiente to climb the mountain, and you can only do it if accompanied by a guide.

My friend Inma is right: every time I look at the mountain of Tindaya, I discover new and wonderful landscapes: I hope that its history and its charm find a way to resist the greedy nature that often distinguishes the human species.